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Cops say Florida man shoved deputies asking about child porn

November 19, 2019 in Florida


Jeffrey Darter

Jeffrey Darter

Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office

A Florida elections official faces battery charges after the Palm Beach Sheriff’s Office said he shoved two deputies who had contacted him in reference to a child-pornography investigation.

Jeffrey Darter, 61, was arrested Wednesday on two felony counts of battering a law enforcement officer, his probable cause affidavit says. NBC Miami first reported that Darter was fired the same day.

The affidavit says investigators had gone to the Supervisor of Elections building in West Palm Beach on Wednesday to ask Darter, who works as an information technology manager, about an image of a man sexually assaulting a 4- to 6-year-old girl. Detectives had traced the picture to a mobile-chat application on Darter’s phone, according to the affidavit.

Darter “stated he could have uploaded the child pornography image by accident but doesn’t know,” the deputy wrote.

During questioning, Darter admitted to not only seeing the photo before but also having friends who are interested in child pornography, the affidavit continues. He declined to identify them.

Darter soon became nervous and refused to let the detectives see his phone. When Darter began using his phone, a detective feared he was deleting pictures so she snatched it. Darter then began pushing the officers in an attempt to get it back, the affidavit says.

Jail records show Darter was taken to a facility in Palm Beach County. He posted $6,000 bond on Thursday.

C. Isaiah Smalls II is a reporter covering breaking and trending news for the Miami Herald. Previously, he worked for ESPN’s The Undefeated as part of their inaugural class of Rhoden Fellows. He is a graduate of both Columbia University and Morehouse College.





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Florida Influencers address state’s complex problems

November 19, 2019 in Florida


Victoria Kasdan, former director of We Care Manatee, participates in day one of the Florida Priorities Summit at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida on Monday, November 18, 2019.

Victoria Kasdan, former director of We Care Manatee, participates in day one of the Florida Priorities Summit at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida on Monday, November 18, 2019.

mocner@miamiherald.com

In order to solve Florida’s wide-ranging and intricate problems, state leaders will need to focus on both creating new policies and better enforcing existing ones.

Over the course of the last seven months, the Florida Influencers — 50 leaders in business, education, healthcare, law and nonprofits — have offered their views on the issues that matter most to people who live in the Sunshine State. On Monday, the Influencers gathered for an in-person summit at the University of Miami to discuss, debate and produce concrete recommendations for Florida’s leaders.

The Florida Priorities Summit is a project by the Miami Herald, el Nuevo Herald and Bradenton Herald to bring experts together in lively debate over the subjects that matter in the state.

Mindy Marques, editor and publisher of the Miami Herald, told the room that the point of the project — now in its second year — is to “help Floridians find solutions to the vexing problems that they face.”

“It’s more than just identifying problems, we wanted you to come up with solutions to help address these critical issues,” she said.

Kristin Roberts, McClatchy’s vice president of news, told the room that the purpose of their recommendations is to “break the cycle of triage” in today’s political discourse.

“We are finally getting to a place where we can disagree with one another in a civil way,” she said.

The Influencers were sectioned off into teams tackling the economy, education, environment, healthcare, housing and transportation.

Economy

The economy team, led by Venture Café executive director Leigh-Ann Buchanan, came to an agreement that the economy “does not thrive in silos.”

“Instead, it requires the acknowledgment that equitable educational opportunities, lack of integrated transportation infrastructure, affordable housing and environmental threats impact the economic viability of our state,” they wrote.

In order to achieve economic viability for years to come, lawmakers need to articulate by the end of the legislative session a measurable, transparent, achievable and inspiring plan of action.

“There’s a lack of a long-term strategy or vision or a sustainable economy that outdates term limits and lives on for future generations,” Buchanan said.

Influencers recommended that the state prioritize the recruitment startups or mid-sized companies by adapting best practices for incentive packages from other jurisdictions, involving more stakeholders and re-designing workforce initiatives that respond to the needs of smaller businesses.

They also recommended that the state adopt an annual, mandatory audit of all governments to publicly measure inclusivity. The Legislature should leverage the current economic strength to prioritize investment in the newer economic drivers that center on affordability, sustainability, environmental health and innovation, they wrote.

Lastly, they recommend the governor create an Office of Entrepreneurship, Access and Equity that would be tasked with allocating resources toward education for entrepreneurship as both a driver of economic development in the state and individual economic mobility for all.

Education

Leaders from higher education and beyond came to an agreement that Florida is approaching an inflection point as it pertains to creating access to quality education for children and ensuring that they are ready for the workforce of the future.

Led by Florida International University Vice President of Engagement Saif Ishoof, the Influencers recommended that Floridians embrace technology and equip learners with the skills to lead the state for years to come.

Their suggestions include more investment in classroom technologies, better partnerships between businesses and educators, more funding for teacher professional development and support for college-ready children in historically disenfranchised communities.

Ishoof said a lot of the recommendations “spoke to the spirit of what’s already happening in our state.”

Gov. Ron DeSantis has committed to supporting increases in teacher wages, and the Legislature last year passed a wide-ranging education bill including an expansion of workforce training and apprenticeships.

“There’s lots of positive momentum underway,” Ishoof said. “Now it’s about implementation and ensuring there is a deepening of those investments that are taking place.”

Environment

Florida is the third most populous state and growing exponentially, and it is currently in a state of environmental crisis, the Influencers concluded. Environmental issues are top of mind, per the last Influencers poll, which concluded that lawmakers must prioritize finding ways to handle water quality on the coasts, rising seas and extreme weather, among other environmental issues.

Led by Audubon Executive Director Julie Wraithmell, the Influencers came up with three potential solutions that would address climate, water and land use.

On climate, they suggested state officers conduct an annual state climate assessment to look at resilience baselines and benchmarks so as to track progress on implementation.

“With visionary leadership and some shared adversity, we can avoid the worst impacts of climate change and ensure Florida’s future prosperity,” they wrote in their recommendation.

On water, the Influencers said regulation and restoration expenses should be distributed equitably, so that those who live, work and visit here can continue to enjoy Florida and continue contributing to the economy. Decision-makers must carefully consider not only the cost of regulations but also the costs of inaction, they wrote.

Lastly, on land use, Influencers said lawmakers must consider population growth, immigration and climate-driven migration while prioritizing resilient locations, population density and mass transit.

“Our environment is everything to us in Florida,” Wraithmell said. “We need to take care to safeguard that. In the face of dramatic challenges, we need to think carefully about how do we want to grow sustainably in the coming century.”

Healthcare

The healthcare team, led by Florida AARP Director Jeff Johnson, suggested that the state first address health costs and access as they consider how to best deliver healthcare to Floridians.

They concluded that while healthcare is a complicated issue, the Legislature can make progress on using technology to create a better culture of informed health. They also suggested that the state increase transparency in the healthcare system so that patients can make more informed choices on coverage and payment options, potential surprise billing and comparative costs for standard tests and services.

The Influencers’ main suggestion was around telehealth, and reimbursing doctors who see patients via telehealth the same way other doctors are reimbursed would help expand patient access and reduce cost. The Legislature passed a law during the 2019 legislative session providing additional guidelines on the use of telehealth in the state.

“There needs to parity, so there isn’t any incentive to lean one way or another,” Johnson said. “This is a legislative and gubernatorial challenge. We’re going to need action on this.”

Ana Lopez-Blazquez, executive vice president of Baptist Health South Florida, added that telehealth will not only help bring down prices for patients but also help out hospitals with patient load.

“Avoidable admission is the way to go,” she said. “What we don’t want is a hospital full of people who don’t need to be there.”

Housing

Florida is in the midst of a serious housing shortage, Influencers concluded Monday.

Current market conditions discourage building or preserving the affordable housing that residents and our economy need to grow, they said, and currently, the state needs over 790,000 additional homes that are affordable to low-income renters.

To address this housing crisis, Influencers recommend that the Legislature and the governor take action using affordable housing trust funds only for affordable housing. In order to support local and state affordable housing programs through a fee on real estate transactions, the William F. Sadowski Affordable Housing Act was adopted in 1992, creating two trust funds for housing. But since the Great Recession, the funds have been routinely raided by Tallahassee lawmakers for other uses like hurricane recovery and general funding.

Influencers, led by Annie Lord of Miami Homes for All, suggested the state address affordable housing by passing legislation that requires all Sadowski Affordable Housing Trust Funds be used only for affordable housing, create incentives to encourage new construction and preservation of affordable homes and create property tax abatements in exchange for lower rents for longer periods.

Lord said the basis of their recommendations is helping address the lack of affordable housing for those earning lower incomes in Florida.

“It’s terribly important we have affordable housing to prepare and educate the next generation of workers in this state,” she said. “Right now, the market is not creating the housing stock that our residents and our economy need. We have to do something about that activity for the future viability of our economy.”

Transportation

The transportation working group concluded that Florida needs to prioritize efficiency and accessibility when it comes to making transportation systems more efficient.

That efficiency will come in the form of technology like autonomous vehicles, electric systems and roadway sensors.

Group leader Marie Woodson, a former Miami-Dade County administrator, said the group must look at broadening regional transportation through state funding and a network that includes city, county and state roadways.

“Sometimes we think just for our county or our city, but it’s not just about that,” Woodson said. “When you have to move people, it’s better to come up with a statewide strategy.”

Samantha J. Gross is a politics and policy reporter for the Miami Herald. Before she moved to the Sunshine State, she covered breaking news at the Boston Globe and the Dallas Morning News.





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One man dead after traffic dispute in Oakland Park: BSO

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Detectives are searching for the other driver involved in a traffic dispute that left a Fort Lauderdale man dead, according to the Broward Sheriff’s Office.

Detectives are searching for the other driver involved in a traffic dispute that left a Fort Lauderdale man dead, according to the Broward Sheriff’s Office.

Detectives are searching for the other driver in a traffic dispute that left a Fort Lauderdale man dead, according to the Broward Sheriff’s Office.

A man with a gunshot wound was seen sprawled out on the roadway near the 200 block of East Oakland Park Boulevard in Oakland Park just after 6 p.m. on Sunday. The man was later identified as 27-year-old Ian Curtis.

Investigators say Curtis was driving a Mercedes-Benz when he began arguing with an unknown man in a white full-size pickup truck. Curtis got out of his vehicle, then suddenly dropped to the ground, according to BSO.

A passerby discovered Curtis’ body and performed CPR until paramedics arrived. Curtis was taken to Broward Health Medical Center where he was later pronounced dead.

BSO is offering a reward up to $3,000 for information. The driver or anyone with information should call BSO Detective John Curcio at 954-321-4212. Those wishing to remain anonymous should contact Broward Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS (8477) or online at browardcrimestoppers.org.

C. Isaiah Smalls II is a reporter covering breaking and trending news for the Miami Herald. Previously, he worked for ESPN’s The Undefeated as part of their inaugural class of Rhoden Fellows. He is a graduate of both Columbia University and Morehouse College.





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K9 program hopes to improve first responders’ mental health

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Capt. Shawn Campana needed an escape. The stress and pressures of working in Miami-Dade Fire Rescue were beginning to weigh on her.

Enter Charlie, a 3-year-old Greyhound she adopted in 2015.

“There’s light again,” Campana said of Charlie, “and there hasn’t been in some time. He was the only thing that made that happen.”

Four years later, she stood next to Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez and County Commissioner Sally Heyman as the trio announced the expansion of the K9 Response Program. The program, which Campana started in 2016, is designed to help first responders cope with occupational stress and victims in crisis situations.

As a former firefighter, this program holds special place in Gimenez’s heart.

“I know first-hand how tough it can be to see the loss of life that we often have to face,” Gimenez told reporters Monday at Haulover Park in Northeast Miami-Dade.

The program, a leader across the nation, has two functions. Trained handlers and dogs can be sent out to help firefighters who have returned from a difficult assignment. The other involves each station having its own therapy dog.

A response K9 “is a therapy dog on steroids,” Campana said with a smile. “But really it’s a K9 and handler trained to deal with people in crisis to provide relief and comfort.”

The timing of the expansion couldn’t be better. Before the program’s expansion, there was no place for Campana to train the dogs and handlers. Now, dogs will be trained and housed at the MDFR Ocean Rescue Station at Haulover Park.

In addition to the previous lack of infrastructure, there’s the need to address the issue of mental health among first responders.

A 2017 Ruderman Family Foundation study found first responders have rates of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression five times higher than the standard civilian. Additionally, the study discovered they are more likely to die by suicide than in the line of duty.

With the demand for therapy dogs already apparent, the only thing needed were the K9s themselves. Then came Amendment 13. This statewide voter referendum banned greyhound racing in Florida — but left many dogs without homes.

“We are rescuing dogs that need to be rescued,” Heyman said. “We are not going out in Miami-Dade and buying dogs.”

That, Heyman says, will save the county “thousands of dollars.” Officials also say no taxpayer money is used for training or housing.

MDFR plans to adopt and train dogs not just through the Greyhound Association but also with Miami-Dade Animal Services.

Three years after Charlie became the program’s first graduate, MDFR now has 10 therapy dogs of various breeds. Campana says the next step is getting each station its own therapy dog. Each K9 will take four months to train, but that will give stations the time to apply and meet the various housekeeping requirements to be eligible.

With the applications already flooding in, Gimenez hopes the dogs will do for all firefighters across the state what was done with Campana.

“These therapy dogs will give our first responders the emotional support they need to heal.”

C. Isaiah Smalls II is a reporter covering breaking and trending news for the Miami Herald. Previously, he worked for ESPN’s The Undefeated as part of their inaugural class of Rhoden Fellows. He is a graduate of both Columbia University and Morehouse College.





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DeSantis budget priorities: teacher pay, environment

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Gov. Ron DeSantis on Monday proposed a $91.4 billion state budget for next year, touting plans to funnel more money to public-school teachers and continue “momentum” on environmental issues.

Gov. Ron DeSantis on Monday proposed a $91.4 billion state budget for next year, touting plans to funnel more money to public-school teachers and continue “momentum” on environmental issues.

News Service of Florida

Gov. Ron DeSantis on Monday proposed a record $91.4 billion state budget for the next fiscal year that includes spending an additional $1 billion on teacher raises.

The proposed budget is more than $400 million higher than the current year and also includes plans to spend millions to protect the state’s elections systems and hire hundreds of new prison guards.

“I think all the stuff we’ve laid out is doable, possible, and I think it will make a real impact with the state of Florida,” DeSantis told reporters on Monday. “We are trying for bolder, brighter and better, and that’s just going to be our mantra.”

The centerpiece of DeSantis’ 2020-21 budget is his two proposals to raise the pay of Florida teachers in an effort to mitigate the state’s teacher shortage.

His pitch is to raise the minimum salary for all classroom teachers to $47,500 and create a new bonus program for teachers and principals, announced last week.

The budget released Monday provided new details about how that money would be distributed, a major question considering past efforts to raise teacher salaries by then-Gov. Rick Scott were stymied at the local level. State law dictates that any change in teacher pay must go through school boards, allowing for teachers’ unions to be able to bargain over the outcome.

DeSantis’ budget would insert the money for both the raises and the bonuses into a specific per-student funding mechanism with explicit language outlining how it should be spent.

House Speaker José Oliva, R-Miami Lakes, generally commended DeSantis’ budget on Monday, but added that “the details of his ambitious teacher-pay program remain obscure — not a small matter.”

The governor also recommended a per-student increase of $50 to the “base student allocation,” flexible spending that districts are allowed to use on everything from electric bills to salaries. That’s a smaller increase than this year’s $75 per student, but still heftier than 2018, when it was increased by 47 cents, a figure that drew rebukes from superintendents.

In February, DeSantis recommended a $91.3 billion budget for his first fiscal year in office. But that budget was mostly a leftover of his predecessor. Agencies submitted their budget requests months earlier, when Rick Scott was still governor.

Lawmakers, who actually craft the budget, slimmed it by roughly $200 million during the legislative session, and DeSantis vetoed another $131 million in projects before signing it.

Except for teacher raises, DeSantis is not proposing radical changes to the state budget. More than a third of the budget is federal money that the governor and lawmakers have little discretion over. About a quarter of the budget is made up of state trust funds, money raised through fees that are assigned to particular projects, such as road building.

The largest slice of the budget, an estimated $35 billion for the next fiscal year, comes mostly from sales taxes, and the Legislature has broad discretion over how that money is spent. Although state economists are expecting a recession on the horizon, they’re predicting an additional $1.4 billion in new revenue.

For the next fiscal year, DeSantis would spend:

$1.3 million to hire 10 people dedicated to elections cybersecurity, something the secretary of state’s office has been asking for for years.

$8.3 million for 20 new positions within the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to create the nation’s first threat assessment program, an effort to stop mass shooters and other domestic terrorists.

$50 million for Visit Florida, the state’s tourism marketing agency, maintaining the same funding it received this year.

$1.4 billion in state and federal dollars for areas hit by hurricanes Hermine, Matthew, Irma and Michael.

$1 million for Burmese python removal in the Everglades, which includes reward money for hunting the invasive species and $100,000 in overtime for state workers.

$625 million for environmental programs including water-quality improvements, Everglades restoration, and springs restoration.

About $387 million from the state’s affordable housing trust fund for affordable housing across the state. The Legislature has usually spent those dollars on other projects.

The budget is also notable for what it doesn’t include:

It devotes no new money to implement Amendment 4, which restored the right to vote to nearly all felons in Florida. Because of a law passed by the Legislature, the state is likely to spend millions creating a database for felons to easily check whether they’re eligible to vote. But how much that effort will cost hasn’t yet been determined.

For the most part, state workers would not see raises.

Tuition at state universities would not increase.

And it doesn’t include millions of dollars and hundreds of new positions that prosecutors and public defenders asked for. The governor’s office said it was waiting on a state study on prosecutor and public defender caseloads before taking another look at their requests.

DeSantis also touted his recommendation for additional money for the state’s Department of Children and Families, though the proposal is a fraction of the $275 million requested by the department before the Legislature earlier this year.

More than $97 million in DeSantis’ plan would be set aside for a bevy of services, from additional adoption subsidies to more money for quality assurance and oversight functions that had previously been delegated to the state’s largely privatized child welfare system.

The budget also sets aside some money — $56.5 million — to slightly ease a 21,900-person waiting list for home and community based services funded by Medicaid through the Agency for Persons with Disabilities. The money would add about 1,200 people in crisis to the program; about 740 people in crisis have been enrolled annually, according to the agency’s documents.

But the plan does not elaborate in detail on a pending redesign of that overall Medicaid waiver program, which has drawn criticism from the Legislature for overspending funds, though those funds are allocated by lawmakers.

Notably, DeSantis incorporated Department of Corrections Secretary Mark Inch’s request for new money to begin transitioning a third of the state’s prisons from having their correctional officers on 12-hour shifts back to 8.5-hour shifts. The money would allow for the hiring of 292 new officers.

When presenting to lawmakers this fall, Inch painted a grim picture of prison staffing, describing how the long shifts had been contributing to burnout and high turnover and exacerbated prison violence and contraband.

During the budget announcement, DeSantis said he agreed with the assessment by Inch, formerly the director of the federal Bureau of Prisons.

“The morale has been low and General Inch has been to a lot of these different organizations at the federal level, the military, and I think he sees the problem,” he said.

DeSantis also proposes to add prison teachers and investigators, a move his office said would help the department resolve its allegations of officer misconduct, including recent prison beatings.

In addition, DeSantis is requesting an increase of $25 million for mental health services in schools.

For Florida’s universal pre-K program for 4-year-olds, called Voluntary Prekindergarten, the governor is proposing a small increase in per-student funding, from $2,437 to $2,486. However, that amount is still below the $2,500 doled out when the program was first created in 2002.





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Georgia deputy rescues deer stuck in fence

November 18, 2019 in Florida



A Georgia deputy rescued a deer stuck in a fence.The Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office posted body camera footage on its Facebook page. The video showed the officer coming to the rescue of the distressed deer. The deer was stuck at the waist in the fence. The video showed the officer holding together the deer’s hind legs and helping push the deer all the way through the fence. Watch the body cam footage above.

A Georgia deputy rescued a deer stuck in a fence.

The Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office posted body camera footage on its Facebook page.

The video showed the officer coming to the rescue of the distressed deer.

The deer was stuck at the waist in the fence. The video showed the officer holding together the deer’s hind legs and helping push the deer all the way through the fence.

Watch the body cam footage above.



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Brookside MS teacher arrested, accused of inappropriately touching students

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Police believe there may be more victims

SARASOTA, Fla. (WFLA) – A middle school teacher in Sarasota has been charged with lewd and lascivious conduct after police say two students accused him of inappropriately touching them. Authorities now believe there may be more victims.

Sarasota police arrested 34-year-old Maxwell Guss of Bradenton on Monday afternoon. According to the police department, Guss has been on administrative leave from Brookside Middle School, where he was a business teacher.

Detectives were initially called to the middle school in early September. Two students told detectives Guss had inappropriately touched them in the beginning of the month, according to the police department.

Later, in October, police say they met with an assistant principal at Sarasota High School, where Guss previously worked as an algebra teacher. During the meeting, detectives learned a student at Sarasota High accused Guss of inappropriately touching her in 2017. According to detectives, that student told school administration back in 2017 when it happened but the school administration never reported it to law enforcement.

Sarasota detectives believe there may be more victims out there. In addition to working at Brookside Middle and Sarasota High, Guss also previously taught in Manatee County at Harllee Middle School and Bayshore High School.

Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Angela Cox at 941-263-6075 or leave an anonymous tip with Crime Stoppers by calling 941-366-TIPS.



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Why was Aaron Carter was hospitalized in Florida?

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Aaron Carter is not in a good way.

The singer was admitted to Ascension Sacred Emerald Coast hospital in Miramar Beach, near Destin, Thursday, according to his Instagram.

Carter is lying on a gurney, covered with a sheet, looking gaunt.

“Momma’s gonna take care of you,” read the caption ostensibly written by his mother Jane Carter, who lives in the Destin area.

So what’s wrong with him?

Jane told TMZ that her son, at 115 pounds, is not only dangerously underweight but stressed, and that she drove him to the ER herself.

Carter is on tour, set to hit a venue in Columbus, Ohio, on Dec. 4 and has a Feb 8, 2020, date playing a Bahamas hurricane relief concert at the Pompano Beach Amphitheatre.

On Saturday, it seemed as if Carter was doing better, at least well enough to take care of his mom.

“My mother is still struggling with her illness and I’d rather be focused on that at this Time,” the 31-year-old tweeted. “Helping her and my music, life and happiness. It’s time to move in from all this pain.”

The “pain” Carter is referring to may have to also do with his famous older brother Nick Carter. Back in September of this year, the Backstreet Boys singer, 39, and Aaron’s twin sister Angel filed a restraining order against their troubled sibling. Nick accused him at the time of threatening his pregnant wife and both were concerned about Aaron’s “alarming behavior.”

Carter’s hospitalization comes two years after fans began showing concern about his increasingly thin appearance.

The Tampa native, who has also battled an opioid addiction, explained that he had been diagnosed with a hiatal hernia that affects his appetite.

“Basically, I have an eating disorder,” he said at the time after being bulled on social media and later hospitalized for his health problems.

On Sunday night’s E!’s True Hollywood Story, Aaron also admitted to a past opioid addiction brought on by a jaw injury, but was able to get himself sober by going cold turkey.

“Everybody thought, ‘Oh my god, he has AIDS, he’s a crackhead, he’s a methhead,’” he said on the show. “That’s when I realized, OK, either you get your [bleep] together or you make the decision to slowly die.”

Celebrity/real time news reporter Madeleine Marr has been with The Miami Herald since 2003. She has covered such features as travel, fashion and food. In 2007, she helped launch the newspaper’s daily People Page, attending red carpet events, awards ceremonies and press junkets; interviewing some of the biggest names in show business; and hosting her own online show. She is originally from New York City and has two daughters.





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Police funny post about a sheep is lost in Jacksonsville

November 18, 2019 in Florida


Someone at the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has a way with puns.

Over the weekend, the agency posted a picture of a sheep that had apparently lost its way.

“Wool you help us find this sheep’s family?” reads the caption. “He was a bit ram-bunctious in the area of 8200 Old Port Cir and is now being sheep-ish and will not tell us where he lives. Can you help us find his maaaam and daaaad?”

Then a plea:

“If ewe know who the sheep baaalongs to, go ahead and give the Sheriff’s Office a call at 904-630-0500.”

Commenters were appreciative of the post’s humor and added some LOL puns of their own.

“Love the post hope you find his maaaaam.”

“That was really baaaad, but I loved it.”

“Pulled the ‘wool’ over the owners.”

“Too funny. y’all so baaaaaadddd.”

“This is ‘ewe-merous.”

“He needs to be reewenited with his family soon.”

“Don’t sweater it. The owner will shear about this and claim him.”

“It could be a ploy. He could be a felon in sheep’s clothing.”

“They are ‘mutton’ but trouble.”

“Maybe check with Little Bo-Peep?”

Had enough? There are more in the peanut gallery, aka comments section.

As of Monday, the sheep was still in “custody,” according to the agency.

Celebrity/real time news reporter Madeleine Marr has been with The Miami Herald since 2003. She has covered such features as travel, fashion and food. In 2007, she helped launch the newspaper’s daily People Page, attending red carpet events, awards ceremonies and press junkets; interviewing some of the biggest names in show business; and hosting her own online show. She is originally from New York City and has two daughters.





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Central Florida man arrested for punching Little League umpire in the face, deputies say

November 18, 2019 in Florida



A Central Florida man has been arrested after deputies said he punched a little league umpire in the face after he disagreed with the call that was made. It allegedly happened Friday night at Highland City Ball Park in Lakeland. According to an arrest affidavit, Alberto Escartin Ramos, 22, disagreed with a call an umpire made, so after the game he went to the clubhouse to complain.Ramos began screaming at the victim and the victim asked Ramos to leave the ballpark, the affidavit said. Deputies said Ramos responded by screaming he would “kick his a**” and then punched the victim in the face, cutting the victim’s lip and breaking one of his teeth.”This is completely inexcusable – assaulting a little league official while he’s officiating at a game where children are supposed to be having fun, and learning sportsmanlike behavior. Not only was he arrested, he’s also been trespassed from the ballpark,” Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said. Ramos was charged with felony battery and has bonded out of jail.

A Central Florida man has been arrested after deputies said he punched a little league umpire in the face after he disagreed with the call that was made.

It allegedly happened Friday night at Highland City Ball Park in Lakeland.

According to an arrest affidavit, Alberto Escartin Ramos, 22, disagreed with a call an umpire made, so after the game he went to the clubhouse to complain.

Ramos began screaming at the victim and the victim asked Ramos to leave the ballpark, the affidavit said.

Deputies said Ramos responded by screaming he would “kick his a**” and then punched the victim in the face, cutting the victim’s lip and breaking one of his teeth.

“This is completely inexcusable – assaulting a little league official while he’s officiating at a game where children are supposed to be having fun, and learning sportsmanlike behavior. Not only was he arrested, he’s also been trespassed from the ballpark,” Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said.

Ramos was charged with felony battery and has bonded out of jail.



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