You are browsing the archive for 4 layout.

NKBA charts design trends for 2019

April 1, 2019 in Woodworking

An extensive survey of designers and specifiers by the National Kitchen and Bath Association reveals a variety of new trends driving kitchen design. Among those are new appliances, transitional and contemporary styling, and increasing use of L-shaped plans with large islands.

With 538 respondents, including designers, builders, architects, and manufacturers from the U.S. and Canada, the survey highlights a multitude of trends, including design styles, innovations, layouts, size, costs, appliances, accessories, and technology.

The most popular kitchen layout, according to the survey, is far and away the L-style with 62 percent of respondents picking that as most popular. Medium to large islands was cited by 88 percent of respondents, and only 2 percent cited no island at all. U-shaped plans were the second most popular at 21 percent.

And most designers who are doing kitchen remodels are enlarging the kitchen in the process. According to the survey, 78 percent said the new kitchens are slightly to significantly larger. Only 23 percent said the remodeled kitchens are about the same size, and no respondents cited smaller kitchens. The largest single group (45 percent) cited increasing kitchen size up to 25 percent.

So, how big are those kitchens? Nearly three-quarters of respondents said the most popular size is medium or 150-350 square feet. Large kitchens more than 350 square feet accounted for 22 percent of respondents. Small kitchens of less than 150 square feet were cited by only 5 percent in the survey.

The NKBA study also lists Farmhouse as one of the rising trends in kitchen design. Credit: Richard Lensis, designer.

Cost per square foot appears to stay the same or increase as the kitchen size gets bigger. For medium-size kitchens, the mean cost was $48,000. For large kitchens, the mean cost was $90,000.

Appliances seem to be capturing the attention of designers and specifiers as the most interesting new products in the kitchen arena. Some 32 percent chose appliances as the most interesting new product. Cabinets came in at 16 percent, countertops 13 percent, lighting 11 percent, and technology solutions 8 percent.

The technology number might be deceptive because designers said that one of the important features making appliances most interesting was technology, such as interconnectivity, touch screens, sensors and other features. White is the leading appliance color, but with designs that “don’t look like Mom’s appliances.” Other trending appliance colors are black stainless and bright colors.

In a note of caution to cabinet manufacturers and installers, the survey highlights new trends in alternate sizing and placement of appliances. These include under-cabinet and drawer washers and refrigerators, as well as narrow refrigerators and microwave drawers. Flush-mount appliances were also cited.

Light and medium painted wood will continue to be popular in transitional kitchens. Credit: Jeane Dole, designer.

Cabinet trends

Cabinet trends cited in the survey included contemporary European styles with hidden handles, LED interior lighting, vertical-lift doors for wall cabinets, and motorized opening and closing with the touch of a button or knee activation. Outside of the cabinets, pendant lighting is becoming more modern, with more options, and LED technology is improving with better color rendering and the ability to dim.

But cabinet manufacturers cannot rest on their laurels as survey respondents said cabinets are the one area of the kitchen they would most like to see more innovation. Some 19 percent cited cabinets as needing more innovation, and 18 percent said vent hoods needed improvement. Sinks and countertops were at 16 and 13 percent, respectively.

Specific requests for cabinet innovation included wanting more colors and finishes in prefab cabinets, as well as options to finish cabinetry beyond just paint and stains. Designers and specifiers want more transitional door styles and different materials for doors and drawer fronts. They also called on more affordable modern designs and lower-cost cabinetry in general with greater flexibility and customization options.

According to the survey, 80 percent of respondents expect contemporary to overtake traditional styles. Credit: Deborah Kerr, designer.

Technology has really come of age in the kitchen, and designers are responding to that. Some 76 percent expect to see more mobile device accommodations in the kitchen over the next three years. A majority (58 percent) also expect to see more voice-enabled home automation platforms in the coming years. The same number predict the increased appearance of safety technology that alerts homeowners of dangerous situations through their cell phones. Technology that allows for remote food prep was cited by 30 percent, and technology to track food inventory was listed by 33 percent.

Transitional kitchens were the style specified most last year, followed by traditional and contemporary. Looking ahead, 88 percent of respondents expect transitional kitchens to remain the lead style in the next three years, but 80 percent expect contemporary styles will overtake traditional to take the number two spot. In fact, only 46 percent see traditional as a trend over the next three years. Farmhouse (55 percent) and Industrial (50 percent) were also cited as rising trends.

In transitional cabinets specifically for the next three years, the survey predicts rising trends will be light or medium painted wood or wood grain or mixed materials, recessed panel facing, more drawers than doors, integrated storage, and matte decorative hardware or integrated hardware.

In contemporary cabinets, specifically for the next three years, the survey predicts light or medium wood grain, mixed materials, flat-panel/slab facing, more drawers than doors, integrated storage, light or medium tones, and integrated hardware.

Source: The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) is the not-for-profit trade association that owns the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS), as part of Design & Construction Week (DCW). For more information, visit NKBA.org or call 800-THE-NKBA (843-6522).


Source: woodworking network cabinets

An extensive survey of designers and specifiers by the National Kitchen and Bath Association reveals a variety of new trends driving kitchen design. Among those are new appliances, transitional and contemporary styling, and increasing use of L-shaped plans with large islands. With 538 respondents, including designers, builders, architects, and manufacturers from the U.S. and Canada, the survey highlights a multitude of trends, including design styles, innovations, layouts, size, costs, appliances, accessories, and technology. The most popular kitchen layout, according to the survey, is far and away the L-style with 62 percent of respondents picking that as most popular. Medium to large islands was cited by 88 percent of respondents, and only 2 percent cited no island at all. U-shaped plans were the second most popular at 21 percent. And most designers who are doing kitchen remodels are enlarging the kitchen in the process. According to the survey, 78 percent said the new kitchens are slightly to significantly larger. Only 23 percent said the remodeled kitchens are about the same size, and no respondents cited smaller kitchens. The largest single group (45 percent) cited increasing kitchen size up to 25 percent. So, how big are those kitchens? Nearly three-quarters of respondents said the most popular size is medium or 150-350 square feet. Large kitchens more than 350 square feet accounted for 22 percent of respondents. Small kitchens of less than 150 square feet were cited by only 5 percent in the survey. The NKBA study also lists Farmhouse as one of the rising trends in kitchen design. Credit: Richard Lensis, designer. Cost per square foot appears to stay the same or increase as the kitchen size gets bigger. For medium-size kitchens, the mean cost was $48,000. For large kitchens, the mean cost was $90,000. Appliances seem to be capturing the attention of designers and specifiers as the most interesting new products in the kitchen arena. Some 32 percent chose appliances as the most interesting new product. Cabinets came in at 16 percent, countertops 13 percent, lighting 11 percent, and technology solutions 8 percent. The technology number might be deceptive because designers said that one of the important features making appliances most interesting was technology, such as interconnectivity, touch screens, sensors and other features. White is the leading appliance color, but with designs that “don’t look like Mom’s appliances.” Other trending appliance colors are black stainless and bright colors. In a note of caution to cabinet manufacturers and installers, the survey highlights new trends in alternate sizing and placement of appliances. These include under-cabinet and drawer washers and refrigerators, as well as narrow refrigerators and microwave drawers. Flush-mount appliances were also cited. Light and medium painted wood will continue to be popular in transitional kitchens. Credit: Jeane Dole, designer. Cabinet trends Cabinet trends cited in the survey included contemporary European styles with hidden handles, LED interior lighting, vertical-lift doors for wall cabinets, and motorized opening and closing with the touch of a button or knee activation. Outside of the cabinets, pendant lighting is becoming more modern, with more options, and LED technology is improving with better color rendering and the ability to dim. But cabinet manufacturers cannot rest on their laurels as survey respondents said cabinets are the one area of the kitchen they would most like to see more innovation. Some 19 percent cited cabinets as needing more innovation, and 18 percent said vent hoods needed improvement. Sinks and countertops were at 16 and 13 percent, respectively. Specific requests for cabinet innovation included wanting more colors and finishes in prefab cabinets, as well as options to finish cabinetry beyond just paint and stains. Designers and specifiers want more transitional door styles and different materials for doors and drawer fronts. They also called on more affordable modern designs and lower-cost cabinetry in general with greater flexibility and customization options. According to the survey, 80 percent of respondents expect contemporary to overtake traditional styles. Credit: Deborah Kerr, designer. Technology has really come of age in the kitchen, and designers are responding to that. Some 76 percent expect to see more mobile device accommodations in the kitchen over the next three years. A majority (58 percent) also expect to see more voice-enabled home automation platforms in the coming years. The same number predict the increased appearance of safety technology that alerts homeowners of dangerous situations through their cell phones. Technology that allows for remote food prep was cited by 30 percent, and technology to track food inventory was listed by 33 percent. Transitional kitchens were the style specified most last year, followed by traditional and contemporary. Looking ahead, 88 percent of respondents expect transitional kitchens to remain the lead style in the next three years, but 80 percent expect contemporary styles will overtake traditional to take the number two spot. In fact, only 46 percent see traditional as a trend over the next three years. Farmhouse (55 percent) and Industrial (50 percent) were also cited as rising trends. In transitional cabinets specifically for the next three years, the survey predicts rising trends will be light or medium painted wood or wood grain or mixed materials, recessed panel facing, more drawers than doors, integrated storage, and matte decorative hardware or integrated hardware. In contemporary cabinets, specifically for the next three years, the survey predicts light or medium wood grain, mixed materials, flat-panel/slab facing, more drawers than doors, integrated storage, light or medium tones, and integrated hardware. Source: The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) is the not-for-profit trade association that owns the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS), as part of Design & Construction Week (DCW). For more information, visit NKBA.org or call 800-THE-NKBA (843-6522).

Wooden Art Deco Clock

March 30, 2019 in Woodworking

This elegant wooden clock is based on a Cartier design from the Art Deco period. Learn how to make this simple timepiece that can stand on its own or be hung on a wall.

Source


Source: ww popularwoodworking.com

This elegant wooden clock is based on a Cartier design from the Art Deco period. Learn how to make this simple timepiece that can stand on its own or be hung on a wall. Source

Corsi Group names cabinet sales rep award winners

March 29, 2019 in Woodworking

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — The Corsi Group has announced the recipients of their 2018 Sales Representative Awards.

Dominion Sales, Inc. has been awarded the Chairman’s Club Award, recognizing the agency for the highest territory sales dollars in 2018. The Dominion team covers the states of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, West Virginia, Washington, D.C., and eastern Pennsylvania. This is the first time Dominion Sales has been recognized for this achievement with the company.

Second place winner for the Chairman’s Club Award is Conroy & Associates, covering the New England states. Third place for the Chairman’s Club Award is Atlantic Sales & Marketing, covering the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida.

In addition, Dominion Sales, Inc. has been awarded the Zenith Award for highest sales dollar increase in 2018. This is the second year in a row Dominion has won top honors in this category.

Second place winner for the Zenith Award is The Hiatt Group, covering the states of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma. Third place for the Zenith Award is Atlantic Sales & Marketing.

Atlantic Sales & Marketing has been awarded the Summit Award for the highest number of new accounts in 2018. This is the second consecutive year the agency has won the top honors in this category.

Second place winner for the Summit Award is GTL Associates, covering New Jersey and Southeastern New York. Third place honors go to four agencies: Cabinet Savvy Group, LLC, covering Indiana, Ohio, southeastern Michigan and southwestern Pennsylvania; Conroy & Associates; Crescent Marketing Group, Inc., covering California, Nevada and Arizona; and Krengel & Hood, LLC, covering western Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Dakotas. For more information, visit http://TheCorsiGroup.com.


Source: woodworking network cabinets

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — The Corsi Group has announced the recipients of their 2018 Sales Representative Awards. Dominion Sales, Inc. has been awarded the Chairman’s Club Award, recognizing the agency for the highest territory sales dollars in 2018. The Dominion team covers the states of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, West Virginia, Washington, D.C., and eastern Pennsylvania. This is the first time Dominion Sales has been recognized for this achievement with the company. Second place winner for the Chairman’s Club Award is Conroy & Associates, covering the New England states. Third place for the Chairman’s Club Award is Atlantic Sales & Marketing, covering the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida. In addition, Dominion Sales, Inc. has been awarded the Zenith Award for highest sales dollar increase in 2018. This is the second year in a row Dominion has won top honors in this category. Second place winner for the Zenith Award is The Hiatt Group, covering the states of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma. Third place for the Zenith Award is Atlantic Sales & Marketing. Atlantic Sales & Marketing has been awarded the Summit Award for the highest number of new accounts in 2018. This is the second consecutive year the agency has won the top honors in this category. Second place winner for the Summit Award is GTL Associates, covering New Jersey and Southeastern New York. Third place honors go to four agencies: Cabinet Savvy Group, LLC, covering Indiana, Ohio, southeastern Michigan and southwestern Pennsylvania; Conroy & Associates; Crescent Marketing Group, Inc., covering California, Nevada and Arizona; and Krengel & Hood, LLC, covering western Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Dakotas. For more information, visit http://TheCorsiGroup.com.

Finishing with Just Three Tools

March 29, 2019 in Woodworking

Bob Flexner compares the three basic finishing tools (rag, brush, and spray gun) in terms of their cost and efficiency.

Source


Source: ww popularwoodworking.com

Bob Flexner compares the three basic finishing tools (rag, brush, and spray gun) in terms of their cost and efficiency. Source

Stevens Industries names new sales representative Karine Turmel

March 28, 2019 in Woodworking

TEUTOPOLIS, Ill. — Stevens Industries, Inc. has announced the addition of Karine Turmel to the StevensWood sales team. She will serve as the western regional sales manager and is based in Arizona. Turmel’s background in product specification, design and construction made her an ideal choice for the decorative panel division of the company.

Previous experience in the design world meant Turmel came on board already familiar with StevensWood. Leading roles at Artopex and Premoule in Quebec, as well as with Peterman Lumber in Arizona, afforded her the opportunity to work with the products she now represents.

Bill Lane, marketing and distribution chain manager, said, “Karine is an excellent fit for our team. Her understanding of our design collections and customer-centered approach to business are tremendous assets as we continue growing in the Southwest markets. Her skills and background will
give her insight to assist architects, designers and distributors alike.”

StevensWood, the decorative panel division of Stevens Industries, Inc. supplies high-pressure laminated panels, thermofused panels, matched edgebanding, doors and mouldings to fabricators across the country. See http://www.stevens-wood.com.


Source: woodworking network architectural products

TEUTOPOLIS, Ill. — Stevens Industries, Inc. has announced the addition of Karine Turmel to the StevensWood sales team. She will serve as the western regional sales manager and is based in Arizona. Turmel’s background in product specification, design and construction made her an ideal choice for the decorative panel division of the company. Previous experience in the design world meant Turmel came on board already familiar with StevensWood. Leading roles at Artopex and Premoule in Quebec, as well as with Peterman Lumber in Arizona, afforded her the opportunity to work with the products she now represents. Bill Lane, marketing and distribution chain manager, said, “Karine is an excellent fit for our team. Her understanding of our design collections and customer-centered approach to business are tremendous assets as we continue growing in the Southwest markets. Her skills and background will give her insight to assist architects, designers and distributors alike.” StevensWood, the decorative panel division of Stevens Industries, Inc. supplies high-pressure laminated panels, thermofused panels, matched edgebanding, doors and mouldings to fabricators across the country. See http://www.stevens-wood.com.

U.S. launches trade investigation on Chinese cabinetry

March 28, 2019 in Woodworking

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Commerce has initiated an antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigation on wooden cabinetry and vanities imported from China to determine whether they are being unfairly subsidized and dumped in the U.S. market.

In 2018, imports of wooden cabinets and vanities from China were valued at an estimated $4.4 billion, almost half of the estimated $9.5 billion American market.

The petition into the matter was filed March 6 by the American Kitchen Cabinet Alliance, a coalition of more than 25 U.S. cabinet manufacturers. The scope of the petition covers both face-frame and frameless cabinets, made of solid wood and composite panel construction, RTA cabinetry, cabinetry components including doors, drawers, back and end panels, as well as desks, shelves, and tables that are attached to or incorporated in the merchandise.

Excluded from the petition are products already covered under the hardwood plywood or wooden bedroom furniture antidumping duty orders, as well as aftermarket accessory items if imported separately from the wooden cabinet or vanity, including: drawer organization inserts or dividers (straight, round or oblong); carved wooden accessories including corbels and rosettes; and non-wooden cabinet hardware components, including metal hinges, brackets, catches, locks, drawer slides, fasteners, handles, and knobs.

Antidumping occurs when imported products are sold, i.e., “dumped” into the U.S. market at prices below cost. Duties are assessed by the DOC and collected by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in order to protect U.S. businesses and level the playing field for domestic products.

If the DOC makes an affirmative finding in the investigations, and if the U.S. International Trade Commission determines that dumped and/or unfairly subsidized Chinese imports of wooden cabinets and vanities are causing injury to domestic manufacturers, duties would be imposed on the imports.

The alleged dumping margins for China range from 177.36 to 262.18 percent, according to the DOC. There are 36 subsidy programs alleged in the China countervailing duty investigation, including a provision of goods for less than adequate remuneration, loan programs, grant programs, tax programs, and export subsidy programs.

Next steps

If Commerce preliminarily determines that dumping and/or unfair subsidization is occurring, then it will instruct the CBP to start collecting cash deposits from all U.S. companies importing wooden cabinets and vanities from China.

The ITC is also conducting an investigation and will make its preliminary determinations on or before April 22, as to whether the U.S. cabinet industry and its workforce are being harmed by the imports. If the ITC preliminarily determines that there is injury or threat of injury, then Commerce’s investigations will continue, with the preliminary CVD determination scheduled for May 30, and preliminary AD determination scheduled for Aug. 13, unless these deadlines are extended.

Final determinations by Commerce in these cases currently are scheduled for Aug. 13 for the CVD investigation, and Oct. 28, for the AD investigation. If Commerce finds that products are not being dumped and/or unfairly subsidized, or the ITC finds in its final determinations there is no harm to the U.S. industry, then the investigations will end with no duties applied.

The DOC website provides the following case calendar (also included on the DOC fact sheet) :

Event CVD Investigation AD Investigation
Petitions filed March 6, 2019 March 6, 2019
DOC initiation date March 26, 2019 March 26, 2019
ITC preliminary determinations* April 22, 2019 April 22, 2019
DOC preliminary determinations May 30, 2019 Aug. 31, 2019
DOC final determinations Aug. 13, 2019 Oct. 28, 2019
ITC final determinations** Sept. 27, 2019 Dec. 12, 2019
Issuance of orders*** Oct. 4, 2019 Dec. 19, 2019

*If the ITC makes a negative preliminary determination of injury, the investigations are terminated.
**This will take place only in the event of final affirmative determinations from Commerce.
***This will take place only in the event of final affirmative determinations from Commerce and the ITC.  
Where the deadline falls on a weekend/holiday, the appropriate date is the next business day

 


Source: woodworking network cabinets

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Commerce has initiated an antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigation on wooden cabinetry and vanities imported from China to determine whether they are being unfairly subsidized and dumped in the U.S. market. In 2018, imports of wooden cabinets and vanities from China were valued at an estimated $4.4 billion, almost half of the estimated $9.5 billion American market. The petition into the matter was filed March 6 by the American Kitchen Cabinet Alliance, a coalition of more than 25 U.S. cabinet manufacturers. The scope of the petition covers both face-frame and frameless cabinets, made of solid wood and composite panel construction, RTA cabinetry, cabinetry components including doors, drawers, back and end panels, as well as desks, shelves, and tables that are attached to or incorporated in the merchandise. Excluded from the petition are products already covered under the hardwood plywood or wooden bedroom furniture antidumping duty orders, as well as aftermarket accessory items if imported separately from the wooden cabinet or vanity, including: drawer organization inserts or dividers (straight, round or oblong); carved wooden accessories including corbels and rosettes; and non-wooden cabinet hardware components, including metal hinges, brackets, catches, locks, drawer slides, fasteners, handles, and knobs. Antidumping occurs when imported products are sold, i.e., “dumped” into the U.S. market at prices below cost. Duties are assessed by the DOC and collected by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in order to protect U.S. businesses and level the playing field for domestic products. If the DOC makes an affirmative finding in the investigations, and if the U.S. International Trade Commission determines that dumped and/or unfairly subsidized Chinese imports of wooden cabinets and vanities are causing injury to domestic manufacturers, duties would be imposed on the imports. The alleged dumping margins for China range from 177.36 to 262.18 percent, according to the DOC. There are 36 subsidy programs alleged in the China countervailing duty investigation, including a provision of goods for less than adequate remuneration, loan programs, grant programs, tax programs, and export subsidy programs. Next steps If Commerce preliminarily determines that dumping and/or unfair subsidization is occurring, then it will instruct the CBP to start collecting cash deposits from all U.S. companies importing wooden cabinets and vanities from China. The ITC is also conducting an investigation and will make its preliminary determinations on or before April 22, as to whether the U.S. cabinet industry and its workforce are being harmed by the imports. If the ITC preliminarily determines that there is injury or threat of injury, then Commerce’s investigations will continue, with the preliminary CVD determination scheduled for May 30, and preliminary AD determination scheduled for Aug. 13, unless these deadlines are extended. Final determinations by Commerce in these cases currently are scheduled for Aug. 13 for the CVD investigation, and Oct. 28, for the AD investigation. If Commerce finds that products are not being dumped and/or unfairly subsidized, or the ITC finds in its final determinations there is no harm to the U.S. industry, then the investigations will end with no duties applied. The DOC website provides the following case calendar (also included on the DOC fact sheet) : Event CVD Investigation AD Investigation Petitions filed March 6, 2019 March 6, 2019 DOC initiation date March 26, 2019 March 26, 2019 ITC preliminary determinations* April 22, 2019 April 22, 2019 DOC preliminary determinations May 30, 2019 Aug. 31, 2019 DOC final determinations Aug. 13, 2019 Oct. 28, 2019 ITC final determinations** Sept. 27, 2019 Dec. 12, 2019 Issuance of orders*** Oct. 4, 2019 Dec. 19, 2019 *If the ITC makes a negative preliminary determination of injury, the investigations are terminated. **This will take place only in the event of final affirmative determinations from Commerce. ***This will take place only in the event of final affirmative determinations from Commerce and the ITC.   Where the deadline falls on a weekend/holiday, the appropriate date is the next business day  

Kitchen Cabinet Distributors opens 180,000-square-foot Houston center

March 27, 2019 in Woodworking

HOUSTON – Kitchen Cabinet Distributors has expanded its footprint following the grand opening of a 180,000-square-foot showroom and distribution center in Houston, Texas.

The Houston facility was built in response to rising regional demand by contractors and builders for RTA and assembled cabinetry, said Randy Goldstein, CEO of the large Raleigh, North Carolina-based distributor.

“This is our first expansion beyond North Carolina — the first of what we expect will be several,” Goldstein said.

A ribbon cutting marks the official grand opening of Kitchen Cabinet Distributors’ Houston showroom and distribution center.

Kitchen Cabinet Distributors carries about a dozen different product lines of traditional and modern-style frame wood cabinetry for use in kitchens, bath, home offices and closets remodeling and new construction projects. “We have everything in stock, so it’s important for us to have distribution centers close to where our customers are,” Goldstein said. “Being in Texas really opens up our offerings for the Texas market and allows us to better serve parts of the South, Southwest and West Coast.”

Attended by more than two dozen contractors, distributors and media personnel, the March 6 event included a tour of the facility’s assembly stations, dealer portal integration system and new showroom. “Cabinets can be ordered through our online dealer portal with optional assembly services. Additionally, the dealer portal allows customers to view availability, access product specifications, and manage account information,” Goldstein explained.

In business since 2007, Kitchen Cabinet Distributors offers a range of products in a variety of colors and styles, some of which were on display at the recent KBIS in Las Vegas. The company can ship cabinetry flat or assembled, and has full finishing capabilities.

“Whites and grays continue to dominate kitchen and bath projects, but we also offer a variety of other colors and designs to suit varying tastes,” Goldstein said.

“The mass market for high-quality cabinetry continues to grow and for those who are looking for a great value and unlimited design possibilities, our product offers an opportunity for remodeling and other projects that previously wasn’t available,” Goldstein added.

Photo: Kitchen Cabinet Distributors


Source: woodworking network cabinets

HOUSTON – Kitchen Cabinet Distributors has expanded its footprint following the grand opening of a 180,000-square-foot showroom and distribution center in Houston, Texas. The Houston facility was built in response to rising regional demand by contractors and builders for RTA and assembled cabinetry, said Randy Goldstein, CEO of the large Raleigh, North Carolina-based distributor. “This is our first expansion beyond North Carolina — the first of what we expect will be several,” Goldstein said. A ribbon cutting marks the official grand opening of Kitchen Cabinet Distributors’ Houston showroom and distribution center. Kitchen Cabinet Distributors carries about a dozen different product lines of traditional and modern-style frame wood cabinetry for use in kitchens, bath, home offices and closets remodeling and new construction projects. “We have everything in stock, so it’s important for us to have distribution centers close to where our customers are,” Goldstein said. “Being in Texas really opens up our offerings for the Texas market and allows us to better serve parts of the South, Southwest and West Coast.” Attended by more than two dozen contractors, distributors and media personnel, the March 6 event included a tour of the facility’s assembly stations, dealer portal integration system and new showroom. “Cabinets can be ordered through our online dealer portal with optional assembly services. Additionally, the dealer portal allows customers to view availability, access product specifications, and manage account information,” Goldstein explained. In business since 2007, Kitchen Cabinet Distributors offers a range of products in a variety of colors and styles, some of which were on display at the recent KBIS in Las Vegas. The company can ship cabinetry flat or assembled, and has full finishing capabilities. “Whites and grays continue to dominate kitchen and bath projects, but we also offer a variety of other colors and designs to suit varying tastes,” Goldstein said. “The mass market for high-quality cabinetry continues to grow and for those who are looking for a great value and unlimited design possibilities, our product offers an opportunity for remodeling and other projects that previously wasn’t available,” Goldstein added. Photo: Kitchen Cabinet Distributors

Workshop Tips: One More Drawer

March 27, 2019 in Woodworking

There’s never enough storage space in a shop, is there? When I recycled some old kitchen cabinets to use in my shop, I added one more drawer to each one—in the toe-kick space.

Source


Source: ww popularwoodworking.com

There’s never enough storage space in a shop, is there? When I recycled some old kitchen cabinets to use in my shop, I added one more drawer to each one—in the toe-kick space. Source

Lessons learned as Flordia architectural millwork company rebuilds after Hurricane Michael

March 26, 2019 in Woodworking

YOUNGSTOWN, FL – “We have all learned what we think of most in life when everything is in peril, and it is not the things that can be repaired or replaced,” said Edward San Juan, president of E. F. San Juan Custom Moulding & Millwork based in the rural community of Youngstown, Florida in the northwest part of the state, just north of Panama City. A third-generation craftsman of high-quality custom wood mouldings and other architectural millwork, San Juan was one of the hundreds of thousands whose lives were impacted by the Category 4 Hurricane Michael on October 10, 2018.

The storm destroyed E.F. San Juan’s main production facility, but that didn’t stop San Juan and his team—including his father, Ed, his brother-in-law, Buddy, his wife, Mary Kathryn, and their son, Eddie—from getting back to work the week after the storm hit. This work included helping E. F. San Juan’s employees and neighbors, as well as continuing efforts to help those in the community rebuild alongside them.

San Juan expressed his gratitude for the Bay County government and relief organizations’ quick response to the community’s needs and for helping to expedite the process of getting Youngstown back on its feet.

“I’ve never been in that spot before—directly affected by a disaster such as this,” he said. “Today, we feel completely different about it because we’ve seen and experienced it firsthand. It’s an uplifting gift to see how people have responded. We decided to do Christmas bonuses early this year, with additional contributions from various vendors and individuals.” Those donations from outside the company were a welcome respite for E. F. San Juan’s sixty-five employees (they employed eighty before the hurricane), and San Juan expressed his great thanks to all who have given back to the community in many ways.

Businesses such as Northwest Florida’s St. Joe Community Foundation, Disney, Alys Beach, Visit Florida, the Seaside Institute, and many others have made generous donations toward relief, while government aid and national organizations such as the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and Volunteer Florida have been at the foreground of large-scale efforts. But it’s neighbors, friends, and local nonprofits that seem to be making huge impacts across the Florida Panhandle and parts of lower Alabama and Georgia. They have made supply runs almost daily since the storm hit, helped cut and remove fallen trees and debris, secured tarps on damaged roofs, and offered helping hands and shoulders to cry on for survivors. Donations, especially monetary ones, are still very much needed as these organizations continue to help people rebuild their lives.

Edward F. San Juan and son, Edward, who is the third-generation owner/president of the company.

Despite the obvious setbacks, San Juan and his team have found another silver lining as they rebuild their facilities after Hurricane Michael.

“It was an opportunity to slow down a little bit, think about what we needed to do, and make improvements and changes to our facilities and our processes, procedures, and technology,” he said. “This gave us the chance to make those improvements and come back better than before.”

The company was back up and running just a couple of weeks after Hurricane Michael struck, and San Juan and his team have worked tirelessly since then to get back to full capacity. Their offices recently received a new roof and drywall, new paint, and new carpet, and the hardwood flooring was equalized and refinished. Concrete for the foundation of the new production facility was poured on January 7.

“I think everyone on our team will feel the effects of the hurricane for years to come,” said San Juan, “but everybody is glad to be working, and we’re looking forward to a new year.”

A long road to recovery lies ahead for the area affected by Michael, but in the storm’s wake, a united community rises with a clear vision of a much brighter future.

 

E. F. San Juan’s main production facility sustained major damage from Hurricane Michael on October 10 of last year, and their offices were uninhabitable following the storm. The good news is they have just poured the foundation for a new production plant and moved back into the renovated / updated office in Janaury.

About E.F. San Juan, Inc.
The San Juan family’s roots in woodworking can be traced back to the mid-1900s. At that time, Eddie San Juan, father of company founder, Edward F. San Juan, was the family patriarch and a master craftsman whose skill and entrepreneurial spirit formed the basis for E. F. San Juan, Inc. Three generations later, the E. F. San Juan companies have evolved from modest facilities and equipment to a state-of-the-art facility featuring the world’s finest woodworking equipment based in Youngstown, Florida. Coupled with a highly-skilled and dedicated work force, the company continues to set the standard for quality architectural millwork in the markets it serves.
Visit EFSanJuan.com to learn more.


Source: woodworking network architectural products

YOUNGSTOWN, FL – “We have all learned what we think of most in life when everything is in peril, and it is not the things that can be repaired or replaced,” said Edward San Juan, president of E. F. San Juan Custom Moulding & Millwork based in the rural community of Youngstown, Florida in the northwest part of the state, just north of Panama City. A third-generation craftsman of high-quality custom wood mouldings and other architectural millwork, San Juan was one of the hundreds of thousands whose lives were impacted by the Category 4 Hurricane Michael on October 10, 2018. The storm destroyed E.F. San Juan’s main production facility, but that didn’t stop San Juan and his team—including his father, Ed, his brother-in-law, Buddy, his wife, Mary Kathryn, and their son, Eddie—from getting back to work the week after the storm hit. This work included helping E. F. San Juan’s employees and neighbors, as well as continuing efforts to help those in the community rebuild alongside them. San Juan expressed his gratitude for the Bay County government and relief organizations’ quick response to the community’s needs and for helping to expedite the process of getting Youngstown back on its feet. “I’ve never been in that spot before—directly affected by a disaster such as this,” he said. “Today, we feel completely different about it because we’ve seen and experienced it firsthand. It’s an uplifting gift to see how people have responded. We decided to do Christmas bonuses early this year, with additional contributions from various vendors and individuals.” Those donations from outside the company were a welcome respite for E. F. San Juan’s sixty-five employees (they employed eighty before the hurricane), and San Juan expressed his great thanks to all who have given back to the community in many ways. Businesses such as Northwest Florida’s St. Joe Community Foundation, Disney, Alys Beach, Visit Florida, the Seaside Institute, and many others have made generous donations toward relief, while government aid and national organizations such as the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and Volunteer Florida have been at the foreground of large-scale efforts. But it’s neighbors, friends, and local nonprofits that seem to be making huge impacts across the Florida Panhandle and parts of lower Alabama and Georgia. They have made supply runs almost daily since the storm hit, helped cut and remove fallen trees and debris, secured tarps on damaged roofs, and offered helping hands and shoulders to cry on for survivors. Donations, especially monetary ones, are still very much needed as these organizations continue to help people rebuild their lives. Edward F. San Juan and son, Edward, who is the third-generation owner/president of the company. Despite the obvious setbacks, San Juan and his team have found another silver lining as they rebuild their facilities after Hurricane Michael. “It was an opportunity to slow down a little bit, think about what we needed to do, and make improvements and changes to our facilities and our processes, procedures, and technology,” he said. “This gave us the chance to make those improvements and come back better than before.” The company was back up and running just a couple of weeks after Hurricane Michael struck, and San Juan and his team have worked tirelessly since then to get back to full capacity. Their offices recently received a new roof and drywall, new paint, and new carpet, and the hardwood flooring was equalized and refinished. Concrete for the foundation of the new production facility was poured on January 7. “I think everyone on our team will feel the effects of the hurricane for years to come,” said San Juan, “but everybody is glad to be working, and we’re looking forward to a new year.” A long road to recovery lies ahead for the area affected by Michael, but in the storm’s wake, a united community rises with a clear vision of a much brighter future.   E. F. San Juan’s main production facility sustained major damage from Hurricane Michael on October 10 of last year, and their offices were uninhabitable following the storm. The good news is they have just poured the foundation for a new production plant and moved back into the renovated / updated office in Janaury. About E.F. San Juan, Inc. The San Juan family’s roots in woodworking can be traced back to the mid-1900s. At that time, Eddie San Juan, father of company founder, Edward F. San Juan, was the family patriarch and a master craftsman whose skill and entrepreneurial spirit formed the basis for E. F. San Juan, Inc. Three generations later, the E. F. San Juan companies have evolved from modest facilities and equipment to a state-of-the-art facility featuring the world’s finest woodworking equipment based in Youngstown, Florida. Coupled with a highly-skilled and dedicated work force, the company continues to set the standard for quality architectural millwork in the markets it serves. Visit EFSanJuan.com to learn more.

An Affordable, Yet High Quality Jack Plane

March 25, 2019 in Woodworking

Yoav Liberman provides an in-depth critique of the affordable yet high-quality Taytools #5 Bailey plane, as well as offers some suggestions for improvement.

Source


Source: ww popularwoodworking.com

Yoav Liberman provides an in-depth critique of the affordable yet high-quality Taytools #5 Bailey plane, as well as offers some suggestions for improvement. Source

Skip to toolbar