Cameron Christie left his own indelible mark on MSL and Rolling Meadows boys basketball.

The senior was a four-year starter for the Mustangs and was ranked this season as one of the top high school basketball players in Illinois.

In his four years at Meadows, he led the Mustangs to an uncanny 38-2 mark in the MSL East. Meadows won the East title in his last three seasons winning all 30 of the conference games.

This season, Christie averaged 25 points, five rebounds and four assists. He led the Mustangs to a 27-7 record this season and back-to-back regional titles for the first time since 1989.

Christie is a three-year member of the Daily Herald’s Cook All-Area team. He was also named this season to the Associated Press and Illinois Basketball Coaches Association’s Class 4A all-state teams.

He was named MVP of both the Fenton and the 32-team Jack Tosh Tournament at York. Rolling Meadows won both tournaments.

He is also an excellent student with a 4.25 grade point average on a 4.00 scale. To add things off, he has been a leader in his school and community.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

With all this in mind and his play on the court, Christie is the Captain for the Daily Herald Cook County All-Area team.

“He came in as a 15-year old and was never intimated,” Rolling Meadows coach Kevin Katovich said.

“And always rolled with the punches. When everyone knows that you are the guy, the way he handled the pressure, he was always the best version of himself.”

Christie is a pure shooter. He knocked down a school-record 101 three-pointers this season and an incredible 235 for his career. He also was a career 88 percent free-throw shooter.

He ended his career with 1,889 points. That put him third on the all-time scoring in the MSL, trailing only his brother Max, who finished with 2,100 points, and Buffalo Grove’s Brad Allsmiller, who had 2,073 points.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“I always wanted to make sure I made my own name,” Cam Christie said. “I don’t want to be the little brother. I worked hard for my own stuff. I deserve to showcase that and make sure that everyone knows I am a separate person. We have different talents in different spots.”

Katovich said that he always saw the difference.

“He is his own man,” Katovich said. “They are similar in ways and yet so different in others. They were once in a generation talent.”

Christie received offers from 12 Division 1 schools before selecting Minnesota back just before the start of the high school season.

“I am looking forward to it,” Christie said. “We should have a solid team. It should be a big improvement.”

Christie is not only proud of his basketball career, but points to his ability as a student for most of success.

“Education has been at the forefront of our family forever,” Christie said. “Got to make sure you work hard at everything and give you best effort at everything.”

In his four years at Rolling Meadows, the Mustangs won 81 percent of their games, compiling a record of 91-22.

“He just wanted to be part of the community,” Katovich said. “Cam changed the whole dynamics of our school.”

Christie said that he could not have accomplished that feat without his teammates and coaches.

“It was one fun career,” Christie said. “To have that many wins, it was a lot of hard work. I have great teammates, coaches and friends to get that record. It was truly a group effort. “

Christie said that he looks back on his experience at Rolling Meadows with nothing but great memories.

“It has been a ton of fun,” Christie said. “It means a lot to me that I have been able to make an impact on the community. I hope it inspires a lot of young basketball players to do the same.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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