By Dr. Michelle Haas

Many parents and caregivers across Boulder County are breathing a collective sigh of relief as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention has completed the last step in a long and thorough approval process for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5-11 on Nov. 2.

There are roughly 23,500 children between the ages of 5 and 11 in Boulder County who are now eligible to get vaccinated at pharmacies, public health clinics, and health care providers at primary care clinics.

Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) expects demand for the vaccine to initially outpace the available supply, and all vaccinations for 5-11 require appointments at this time.

Distributing vaccines in a timely and equitable manner to our children is a complex undertaking. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized two smaller (10 micrograms) doses (taken three weeks apart) for children ages 5 to 11, which is one-third the dose for adults. The vaccine is distributed separately from the vaccine for adults, in different vials and with its own set of detailed instructions for storage prior and during use, transportation, dilution, and other dose preparation requirements. This limits the number of vaccine providers in the county and appointments fill up quickly.

Vaccines are distributed within Colorado according to priorities set by the state, which are subject to change, sometimes without notice. BCPH will keep its list of providers and clinics up-to-date to reflect supply (boco.org/CovidVaccine).

Providers are striving to meet the high demand for 5-11 vaccination while simultaneously administering boosters to adults, as well as ensuring many adults and youth have access to their first dose of the vaccine. Please allow us a bit of grace as we work to ensure everyone has access. We want everyone to receive a vaccine and we ask for your patience.

The number of children contracting COVID-19 is substantial and is expected to rise as colder weather brings events and activities indoors and due to the proliferation of the highly contagious Delta variant. We remain deeply committed to protecting our community by extending access to our 5 to 11-year-old community members as rapidly as possible.

To date, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) reports a total of 39,232 cases of COVID-19 in people between the ages of 5 and 11, and 213 of those were hospitalized. However, the highly contagious Delta variant has resulted in an increase in case rates and hospitalizations among children and youth.

Getting vaccinated is the best tool available for controlling the pandemic and returning to a time where communities and relationships are not dramatically impacted by COVID-19.

The vaccine provides more than 90% protection against symptomatic disease for ages 5-11. Experts estimate that for every one-million children between ages 5 and 11 vaccinated in the US over the next six months, at the current incidence rate of COVID-19, the vaccine could prevent over 50,000 cases of COVID-19, around 200 hospitalizations, 130 cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, and approximately 60-to-72 ICU admissions.

Talking to your child about what to expect before their vaccine appointment can support preparing them to receive the vaccine and make the process easier. Be open and honest with them about possible side effects and be prepared to offer after the shot is administered.  If this is your first time vaccinating your child, or perhaps your child is worried about this particular vaccine, you may find that it is important to be ready to comfort them and, for some children, to hold them afterwards.

Possible side effects include pain, redness, and swelling in the arm where they got the shot, as well as tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever, and nausea. These side effects are normal signs that the child’s body is building protection and they should go away within a few days. In some cases, children may have no side effects, but this does not mean the vaccine did not work. Each child’s immune system is unique and will react differently.

BCPH recommends that parents use the CDC’s free, smartphone-based tool V-safe, which uses text messaging and surveys to provide personalized health information after your child receives their COVID-19 vaccination. V-safe allows you to report any side effects your child may have and provides a reminder to get your child’s second dose.

The independent advisory board working on analyzing the vaccine reported to the CDC that data did not suggest any safety concerns in this age group. If you have concerns, please talk to your child’s provider.  Children cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine, and they may receive the COVID-19 vaccine with any other vaccines, including the flu vaccine.

Along with vaccination, other strategies for reducing risk of young people include wearing a mask indoors, moving activities and gatherings outside, increasing ventilation in indoor spaces, practicing hand washing hygiene, cohorting and social distancing.

Happy, thriving children are fundamental to Boulder County’s communities, including fully functioning schools, youth sports programs and a wide variety of local businesses. Getting your children vaccinated will provide them with an essential layer of protection to keep them and the entire family healthy and safe.

BCPH would like to listen to stories from parents about why they decided to vaccinate their children and their experiences. If you would like to share your story, please email healthinfo@bouldercounty.org.

Dr. Michelle Haas is Chief Medical Officer for Boulder County Public Health.

Source by [author_name]

By Dr. Michelle Haas

Many parents and caregivers across Boulder County are breathing a collective sigh of relief as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention has completed the last step in a long and thorough approval process for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5-11 on Nov. 2.

There are roughly 23,500 children between the ages of 5 and 11 in Boulder County who are now eligible to get vaccinated at pharmacies, public health clinics, and health care providers at primary care clinics.

Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) expects demand for the vaccine to initially outpace the available supply, and all vaccinations for 5-11 require appointments at this time.

Distributing vaccines in a timely and equitable manner to our children is a complex undertaking. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized two smaller (10 micrograms) doses (taken three weeks apart) for children ages 5 to 11, which is one-third the dose for adults. The vaccine is distributed separately from the vaccine for adults, in different vials and with its own set of detailed instructions for storage prior and during use, transportation, dilution, and other dose preparation requirements. This limits the number of vaccine providers in the county and appointments fill up quickly.

Vaccines are distributed within Colorado according to priorities set by the state, which are subject to change, sometimes without notice. BCPH will keep its list of providers and clinics up-to-date to reflect supply (boco.org/CovidVaccine).

Providers are striving to meet the high demand for 5-11 vaccination while simultaneously administering boosters to adults, as well as ensuring many adults and youth have access to their first dose of the vaccine. Please allow us a bit of grace as we work to ensure everyone has access. We want everyone to receive a vaccine and we ask for your patience.

The number of children contracting COVID-19 is substantial and is expected to rise as colder weather brings events and activities indoors and due to the proliferation of the highly contagious Delta variant. We remain deeply committed to protecting our community by extending access to our 5 to 11-year-old community members as rapidly as possible.

To date, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) reports a total of 39,232 cases of COVID-19 in people between the ages of 5 and 11, and 213 of those were hospitalized. However, the highly contagious Delta variant has resulted in an increase in case rates and hospitalizations among children and youth.

Getting vaccinated is the best tool available for controlling the pandemic and returning to a time where communities and relationships are not dramatically impacted by COVID-19.

The vaccine provides more than 90% protection against symptomatic disease for ages 5-11. Experts estimate that for every one-million children between ages 5 and 11 vaccinated in the US over the next six months, at the current incidence rate of COVID-19, the vaccine could prevent over 50,000 cases of COVID-19, around 200 hospitalizations, 130 cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, and approximately 60-to-72 ICU admissions.

Talking to your child about what to expect before their vaccine appointment can support preparing them to receive the vaccine and make the process easier. Be open and honest with them about possible side effects and be prepared to offer after the shot is administered.  If this is your first time vaccinating your child, or perhaps your child is worried about this particular vaccine, you may find that it is important to be ready to comfort them and, for some children, to hold them afterwards.

Possible side effects include pain, redness, and swelling in the arm where they got the shot, as well as tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever, and nausea. These side effects are normal signs that the child’s body is building protection and they should go away within a few days. In some cases, children may have no side effects, but this does not mean the vaccine did not work. Each child’s immune system is unique and will react differently.

BCPH recommends that parents use the CDC’s free, smartphone-based tool V-safe, which uses text messaging and surveys to provide personalized health information after your child receives their COVID-19 vaccination. V-safe allows you to report any side effects your child may have and provides a reminder to get your child’s second dose.

The independent advisory board working on analyzing the vaccine reported to the CDC that data did not suggest any safety concerns in this age group. If you have concerns, please talk to your child’s provider.  Children cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine, and they may receive the COVID-19 vaccine with any other vaccines, including the flu vaccine.

Along with vaccination, other strategies for reducing risk of young people include wearing a mask indoors, moving activities and gatherings outside, increasing ventilation in indoor spaces, practicing hand washing hygiene, cohorting and social distancing.

Happy, thriving children are fundamental to Boulder County’s communities, including fully functioning schools, youth sports programs and a wide variety of local businesses. Getting your children vaccinated will provide them with an essential layer of protection to keep them and the entire family healthy and safe.

BCPH would like to listen to stories from parents about why they decided to vaccinate their children and their experiences. If you would like to share your story, please email healthinfo@bouldercounty.org.

Dr. Michelle Haas is Chief Medical Officer for Boulder County Public Health.

, COVID-19 vaccines for 5-11 have been approved , Daily Camera guest opinion , 2021-11-04 19:05:43 , Boulder Daily Camera , , https://www.dailycamera.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/DC-backupimage-1000×563.jpg , [rule_{ruleNumber}] , [rule_{ruleNumber}_plain] , , , https://www.dailycamera.com/2021/11/04/opinion-dr-michelle-haas-covid-19-vaccines-for-5-11-have-been-approved/ , https://www.dailycamera.com/2021/11/04/opinion-dr-michelle-haas-covid-19-vaccines-for-5-11-have-been-approved/ , www.dailycamera.com , https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailycamera.com%2F2021%2F11%2F04%2Fopinion-dr-michelle-haas-covid-19-vaccines-for-5-11-have-been-approved%2F , Commentary,Opinion,Uncategorized,All Readers, #COVID19 #vaccines #approved