By Kylie Yuengert

When it comes to timeliness in situations involving student health and safety, the University of Colorado Boulder severely lacks in executing and distributing information. As we approach the anniversary of the Boulder King Soopers mass shooting, it is important to reflect on exactly how the University handles these intense events –– or mishandles these intense events. CU Boulder’s response time is frighteningly slow, for how high and proud they act as an organization.

I remember sitting at home watching the news with my grandmother when the story broke. First I received a tweet notification at 2:49 p.m. from the Boulder Police Department’s page. I saw videos going viral on Twitter and Snapchat of the scene in Boulder, of what looked like bodies in the street. I messaged my cousins, asking them where they were. I scavenged the Internet for more information. I searched for a word from the University but came up with nothing. The CU Boulder Facebook page was riddled with terrified parents and confused students. An hour of worrying about our friends and family members later, the first of three CU Alerts came through… at 3:25 p.m.  An hour after first hearing about the mess.

It read, “CU Alert: Boulder Police are responding to an active shooter at the King Soopers at Table Mesa and Broadway in south Boulder. AVOID THE AREA.”

When you look up the Boulder shooting, it is reported that the tragedy lasted from 2:30 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. You can understand how this is frustrating.  CU retweeted the initial Boulder PD tweet, so why didn’t they send the alert at the same time? It was essentially useless. The hour it took for CU to get on the same page as everyone else could have meant life or death for members of the campus community. It should not have taken most of an hour to tell students to avoid the area following the disturbing and tragic events of March 22, 2021. It just doesn’t help anyone.

The same can be said about recent events. On Feb. 1 there was a barricaded suspect near the University Hill Elementary school. By the time the CU Alert was sent out, children from the elementary school had already been evacuated to the University Memorial Center (which was the area we were alerted to avoid) and the situation was mostly under control. In 2019, a 20-year-old student went missing and was not found until a month later, deceased, just a few miles away from campus within city limits. CU Police neglected to get the county involved in a timely manner, which prolonged the heartache of the student’s family. Not to mention the countless other students we have lost in just the past four years due to a lack of security and safety in the community.

My trust, and many other students’ trust, in the university’s ability to keep us informed has declined rapidly since the very beginning of my CU career.

I’m not saying that the university needs to have some sort of crystal ball that lets them predict the exact moment that things happen. However, it is abundantly clear that CU has a delay in the ways they alert their students and treat high-stake situations. Students at the university deserve to have access to information through the school in the same way that the rest of the community is able to get theirs from Boulder PD. Late information is worthless and could end up putting students in harm’s way.

Not to be blatant, but thanks a lot for nothing. Step it up, CU.

Kylie Yuengert is a senior at the University of Colorado Boulder.

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By Kylie Yuengert

When it comes to timeliness in situations involving student health and safety, the University of Colorado Boulder severely lacks in executing and distributing information. As we approach the anniversary of the Boulder King Soopers mass shooting, it is important to reflect on exactly how the University handles these intense events –– or mishandles these intense events. CU Boulder’s response time is frighteningly slow, for how high and proud they act as an organization.

I remember sitting at home watching the news with my grandmother when the story broke. First I received a tweet notification at 2:49 p.m. from the Boulder Police Department’s page. I saw videos going viral on Twitter and Snapchat of the scene in Boulder, of what looked like bodies in the street. I messaged my cousins, asking them where they were. I scavenged the Internet for more information. I searched for a word from the University but came up with nothing. The CU Boulder Facebook page was riddled with terrified parents and confused students. An hour of worrying about our friends and family members later, the first of three CU Alerts came through… at 3:25 p.m.  An hour after first hearing about the mess.

It read, “CU Alert: Boulder Police are responding to an active shooter at the King Soopers at Table Mesa and Broadway in south Boulder. AVOID THE AREA.”

When you look up the Boulder shooting, it is reported that the tragedy lasted from 2:30 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. You can understand how this is frustrating.  CU retweeted the initial Boulder PD tweet, so why didn’t they send the alert at the same time? It was essentially useless. The hour it took for CU to get on the same page as everyone else could have meant life or death for members of the campus community. It should not have taken most of an hour to tell students to avoid the area following the disturbing and tragic events of March 22, 2021. It just doesn’t help anyone.

The same can be said about recent events. On Feb. 1 there was a barricaded suspect near the University Hill Elementary school. By the time the CU Alert was sent out, children from the elementary school had already been evacuated to the University Memorial Center (which was the area we were alerted to avoid) and the situation was mostly under control. In 2019, a 20-year-old student went missing and was not found until a month later, deceased, just a few miles away from campus within city limits. CU Police neglected to get the county involved in a timely manner, which prolonged the heartache of the student’s family. Not to mention the countless other students we have lost in just the past four years due to a lack of security and safety in the community.

My trust, and many other students’ trust, in the university’s ability to keep us informed has declined rapidly since the very beginning of my CU career.

I’m not saying that the university needs to have some sort of crystal ball that lets them predict the exact moment that things happen. However, it is abundantly clear that CU has a delay in the ways they alert their students and treat high-stake situations. Students at the university deserve to have access to information through the school in the same way that the rest of the community is able to get theirs from Boulder PD. Late information is worthless and could end up putting students in harm’s way.

Not to be blatant, but thanks a lot for nothing. Step it up, CU.

Kylie Yuengert is a senior at the University of Colorado Boulder.

, CU Boulder needs to step up its alert system , Daily Camera guest opinion , 2022-03-20 00:03:18 , Boulder Daily Camera , https://www.dailycamera.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/DCC-L-SHOOTING_MJ27602.jpg?w=1400px&strip=all , https://www.dailycamera.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/DCC-L-SHOOTING_MJ27602.jpg?w=1024&h=657 , [rule_{ruleNumber}] , [rule_{ruleNumber}_plain] , , , https://www.dailycamera.com/2022/03/19/kylie-yuengert-cu-boulder-needs-to-step-up-its-alert-system/ , https://www.dailycamera.com/2022/03/19/kylie-yuengert-cu-boulder-needs-to-step-up-its-alert-system/ , www.dailycamera.com , https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailycamera.com%2F2022%2F03%2F19%2Fkylie-yuengert-cu-boulder-needs-to-step-up-its-alert-system%2F , Commentary,Opinion, #Boulder #step #alert #system