HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) – TransFamily Support Services hosted Alabama’s first Trans Pride Day in Brahan Springs Park on Sunday, bringing together community organizations that support and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community in Alabama.

“With all of the things going on across the country and here in Alabama, it was time to highlight trans joy, to celebrate this community, and in particular let our trans youth know multiple adults they’ve never met, who are in this to help protect them and their rights,” said Kathie Moehlig, the Founder and Executive Director of TransFamily Support Services.

Carmarion D. Anderson-Harvey, the Human Rights Campaign Alabama State Director, said events like this are a step forward for the community.

“It brings the community together, and it supports visibility,” Anderson-Harvey said. “You find other members of the community that are like you and can support you.”

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling on Roe v. Wade, many LGBTQ+ leaders fear future rulings may further endanger personal freedoms beyond abortion rights. In a concurring opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote that the court might reconsider other precedents such as the rights to contraception, same-sex intimacy, and same-sex marriage.

“As someone who is of the trans-identified experience and an equality leader for the state, it’s important that I get a chance to also see the next generation. This was a remarkable day, but it’s a day to educate Alabama that diversity lives in Alabama,” Anderson-Harvey said.

In Alabama, legislators have passed laws making it a felony to prescribe gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors.

“In this state of Alabama, it is showing, when we see bad legislation, that we are still going to show up in our truth and power,” Anderson-Harvey said.

In addition to food and music, the Trans Pride Day event included a resource fair featuring:

“It means visibility. It means something landmark we can build off of and hopefully see more pop up around this area,” said TransFamily Support Services Alabama Programs Manager Mani Blunt.

Janae Smith, the owner of Yum Yum’s, a vendor at the event said she was glad her business could support this pride event.

“It’s important to me for all walks of life to have equality in everything they do,” Smith said.

Event organizers said they hope Sunday’s event is the first of many trans pride events hosted in Alabama.

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) – TransFamily Support Services hosted Alabama’s first Trans Pride Day in Brahan Springs Park on Sunday, bringing together community organizations that support and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community in Alabama.

“With all of the things going on across the country and here in Alabama, it was time to highlight trans joy, to celebrate this community, and in particular let our trans youth know multiple adults they’ve never met, who are in this to help protect them and their rights,” said Kathie Moehlig, the Founder and Executive Director of TransFamily Support Services.

Carmarion D. Anderson-Harvey, the Human Rights Campaign Alabama State Director, said events like this are a step forward for the community.

“It brings the community together, and it supports visibility,” Anderson-Harvey said. “You find other members of the community that are like you and can support you.”

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling on Roe v. Wade, many LGBTQ+ leaders fear future rulings may further endanger personal freedoms beyond abortion rights. In a concurring opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote that the court might reconsider other precedents such as the rights to contraception, same-sex intimacy, and same-sex marriage.

“As someone who is of the trans-identified experience and an equality leader for the state, it’s important that I get a chance to also see the next generation. This was a remarkable day, but it’s a day to educate Alabama that diversity lives in Alabama,” Anderson-Harvey said.

In Alabama, legislators have passed laws making it a felony to prescribe gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors.

“In this state of Alabama, it is showing, when we see bad legislation, that we are still going to show up in our truth and power,” Anderson-Harvey said.

In addition to food and music, the Trans Pride Day event included a resource fair featuring:

“It means visibility. It means something landmark we can build off of and hopefully see more pop up around this area,” said TransFamily Support Services Alabama Programs Manager Mani Blunt.

Janae Smith, the owner of Yum Yum’s, a vendor at the event said she was glad her business could support this pride event.

“It’s important to me for all walks of life to have equality in everything they do,” Smith said.

Event organizers said they hope Sunday’s event is the first of many trans pride events hosted in Alabama.

, Huntsville hosts Alabama’s first Trans Pride Day , Kayla Smith , 2022-06-27 01:39:31 , WHNT.com , https://whnt.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/20/2022/06/TRANS-PRIDE-PIC-3.jpg?w=900 , https://whnt.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/20/2022/06/TRANS-PRIDE-PIC-3.jpg?w=1280 , [rule_{ruleNumber}] , [rule_{ruleNumber}_plain] , https://whnt.com/news/huntsville/huntsville-hosts-alabamas-first-trans-pride-day/ , https://whnt.com/news/huntsville/huntsville-hosts-alabamas-first-trans-pride-day/ , whnt.com , https%3A%2F%2Fwhnt.com%2Fnews%2Fhuntsville%2Fhuntsville-hosts-alabamas-first-trans-pride-day%2F , Huntsville,Community,News, #Huntsville #hosts #Alabamas #Trans #Pride #Day