Members of Longmont’s City Council on Tuesday will discuss the possibility of contributing staff to assist Louisville in its efforts to recover from the Marshall Fire, with the first $20,000 in hours donated to the recovering city.

On Tuesday the Council will hear a first reading of the intergovernmental agreement with Louisville. During a January meeting councilmembers asked staff to look into ways Longmont could help communities impacted by the fire and bring an item to the agenda for future discussion. Based on direction from that meeting, the first $20,000 in staff support could be funded by the council contingency, if it’s approved.

A Council communications report, which provided background on the issue, said preliminary estimates show Louisville suffered more than $229 million in damage — a dollar amount that is rising as people begin the rebuilding process. Boulder County’s damage assessment from the fire reports 550 residential structures destroyed and 43 damaged. Louisville also had four commercial structures demolished and 14 damaged.

Longmont is uniquely positioned to help Louisville, council communications said, because city staff have expertise in recovering from the 2013 flood, including in organization of disaster recovery, writing public assistance requests for consideration by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, writing housing grants and monitoring with the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development as well as best practices in emergency management and disaster recovery.

City staff said the intergovernmental agreement could help Louisville with any or all of these areas of expertise. Louisville will request Longmont resources and reimburse the city for salaries, outside donated staff hours.

Also on Tuesday

Tuesday night the Council will discuss another intergovernmental agreement — this one between the city and the state that could provide an opportunity to fund a number of repairs needed at the historic Callahan House.

The Callahan House was awarded $180,000 from the History Colorado State Historical Fund grant, according to council communications, which will help leverage the city’s Capital Improvement Program funding for $60,000.

The Terry Street home was built in 1892 and gifted to Longmont in 1938. The funds are planned to restore the Callahan House’s curved, leaded-glass window in the library, protect all leaded- and stained-glass windows with tempered glass, repaint the house and auto house to historically correct colors that were used before 1906; and repair and preserve the decorative driveway, which was built for the first automobile in Longmont. The Callahans purchased their automobile in 1902, according to the city’s webpage. They built an automobile house in December of that year.

Council will also discuss whether to approve the resolution and have the mayor sign an award acknowledgment and conditions letter.

Longmont’s Council meeting will take place remotely at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Residents can find a link to listen to the meeting by clicking on the regular session agenda on the city’s website at bit.ly/3sLwNMI.

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Members of Longmont’s City Council on Tuesday will discuss the possibility of contributing staff to assist Louisville in its efforts to recover from the Marshall Fire, with the first $20,000 in hours donated to the recovering city.

On Tuesday the Council will hear a first reading of the intergovernmental agreement with Louisville. During a January meeting councilmembers asked staff to look into ways Longmont could help communities impacted by the fire and bring an item to the agenda for future discussion. Based on direction from that meeting, the first $20,000 in staff support could be funded by the council contingency, if it’s approved.

A Council communications report, which provided background on the issue, said preliminary estimates show Louisville suffered more than $229 million in damage — a dollar amount that is rising as people begin the rebuilding process. Boulder County’s damage assessment from the fire reports 550 residential structures destroyed and 43 damaged. Louisville also had four commercial structures demolished and 14 damaged.

Longmont is uniquely positioned to help Louisville, council communications said, because city staff have expertise in recovering from the 2013 flood, including in organization of disaster recovery, writing public assistance requests for consideration by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, writing housing grants and monitoring with the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development as well as best practices in emergency management and disaster recovery.

City staff said the intergovernmental agreement could help Louisville with any or all of these areas of expertise. Louisville will request Longmont resources and reimburse the city for salaries, outside donated staff hours.

Also on Tuesday

Tuesday night the Council will discuss another intergovernmental agreement — this one between the city and the state that could provide an opportunity to fund a number of repairs needed at the historic Callahan House.

The Callahan House was awarded $180,000 from the History Colorado State Historical Fund grant, according to council communications, which will help leverage the city’s Capital Improvement Program funding for $60,000.

The Terry Street home was built in 1892 and gifted to Longmont in 1938. The funds are planned to restore the Callahan House’s curved, leaded-glass window in the library, protect all leaded- and stained-glass windows with tempered glass, repaint the house and auto house to historically correct colors that were used before 1906; and repair and preserve the decorative driveway, which was built for the first automobile in Longmont. The Callahans purchased their automobile in 1902, according to the city’s webpage. They built an automobile house in December of that year.

Council will also discuss whether to approve the resolution and have the mayor sign an award acknowledgment and conditions letter.

Longmont’s Council meeting will take place remotely at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Residents can find a link to listen to the meeting by clicking on the regular session agenda on the city’s website at bit.ly/3sLwNMI.

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